SEE US FOR US

Photographer: Jordan Hawkins; Contributors: Tawana Green, Jordan Hawkins, Diamond Holliday, Gentry Roper

From left to right: Jordan Hawkins, Tawana Green, Gentry Roper, Diamond Holliday

In clockwise order: Gentry Roper, Tawana Green, Jordan Hawkins, Diamond Holliday

This February, in honor of Black History Month, Compass is proud to celebrate our leaders' unique stories. We invite our customers to move past the stereotypes, the misconceptions, the assumptions, and get to know the individuals who make up our cafés.


Gentry Roper

Café Manager in Training

"I was actually lucky enough to meet [Angela Davis]. She spoke at my school for Black History Month [... and she] told me 'Keep the high ground. Keep fighting for your rights. And do it in the best way possible.'"

Tell us a bit about yourself, your role, and your experience at Compass Coffee.

My name is Gentry Roper. I am a Colorado transplant and have been in DC, and at Compass, for about a year. I am a Supervisor at our Spring Valley location, but started my Compass journey at our Ballston café last February as part of their opening team. I have really loved getting to know the customers at Spring Valley. They are very friendly, chatty, and are so easy to talk to. That being said, I do still love the Ballston café. The area is always hustling and bustling, and Ballston Quarter is a prime food spot!

What does Black History Month mean to you and why is it important to celebrate this month?

I think it is important that we have Black History Month set aside because we need to acknowledge that we can’t talk about America’s history without including Black history. Honestly, I have mixed feelings about Black History Month. For me, it is a tool that we can use to dive further into America’s History, but it should also be celebrated past just the 28 days of February. We have seen the celebration of Black History Month extend from just a single day, to a week, to now a month. This is so positive, but I would like to see Black history taught in the schools year-round.

In retrospect, the Black history I was taught in school felt narrow in scope; Rosa Parks, Frederick Douglas, and Martin Luther King Jr. come to mind. Those people are so important, but in reality, there is so much more to discuss. People like Angela Davis and Fred Hampton need to be highlighted more often. We need to also acknowledge the difficult truths, like the fact that Martin Luther King jr. wasn’t well liked by the majority of the American people during the Civil Rights Movement, or that America would not be the powerhouse it is today without the exploitation of Black people through slavery. That is why it is important to keep educating ourselves on the past; there are so many more conversations to have.

Who is your role model? Who do you look up to?

My aunt. She was the oldest of 4 siblings and the only daughter. She was such a powerful woman, and carried herself in a way that commanded attention. But also, of course, Beyonce. It is awesome to see Black Women own who they are and exude confidence. She consistently provides a powerful message for all women, especially Black women, which is why I even got a tattoo of some of her song lyrics. I also love Flo Jo, still the fastest woman alive, rest in peace. As someone who is passionate about fitness, she is truly an inspiration to me. And last but not least, I can't forget Angela Davis, who is an American political activist and known for her association with the Black Panthers. I was actually lucky enough to meet her. She spoke at my school for Black History Month. Angela Davis told me “Keep the high ground. Keep fighting for your rights. And do it in the best way possible.”

What are you passionate about?

Being from Colorado, I really love hiking and exercising outdoors, but of course, with the cold I have been doing mostly home workouts. I love pilates, I love HIIT workouts — really, anything that gets my heart rate up and gets those endorphins flowing is awesome. I love listening to music; I especially miss concerts right now. Music makes me feel. When I am sad, music allows me to express my feelings and turn them into something constructive. And no matter my mood, I can always blast Beyonce.

What is something that you would want our customers to know about you?

I feel like I already share a lot with my customers. But I want my customers to know that I have a great listening ear if there are questions that they have about something. We live in an area where people talk about politics all of the time, and it's normal to have questions. I don’t want them to feel like they can’t share anything with me, and vice versa. I would love to have those conversations candidly and respectively.

This February, in honor of Black History Month, Compass is proud to celebrate our leaders' unique stories. We invite our customers to move past the stereotypes, the misconceptions, the assumptions, and get to know the individuals who make up our cafés.


Gentry Roper

Café Manager in Training

"I was actually lucky enough to meet [Angela Davis]. She spoke at my school for Black History Month [... and she] told me 'Keep the high ground. Keep fighting for your rights. And do it in the best way possible.'"

Tell us a bit about yourself, your role, and your experience at Compass Coffee.

My name is Gentry Roper. I am a Colorado transplant and have been in DC, and at Compass, for about a year. I am a Supervisor at our Spring Valley location, but started my Compass journey at our Ballston café last February as part of their opening team. I have really loved getting to know the customers at Spring Valley. They are very friendly, chatty, and are so easy to talk to. That being said, I do still love the Ballston café. The area is always hustling and bustling, and Ballston Quarter is a prime food spot!

What is your go-to coffee drink in the morning?

Depends on how busy it is. If I am looking for a quick caffeine boost, I’ll go with a cortado or cold brew. If I have more time in the morning, then I’ll make an Iced Pour Over of Ethiopia or Nicaragua. Sometimes I will put a dash of vanilla syrup in my coffee, but otherwise just the plain iced coffee is perfect for me! At home, on days off, I normally drink tea. Our Morrocan Mint tea is the best, so that is what I drink at home. My family makes our coffee in a Mr. Coffee Pot; they especially like First Bake or Brazil. They try to get me to make their coffee for them; I am pretty sure that's why they keep me around ;).

What does Black History Month mean to you and why is it important to celebrate this month?

I think it is important that we have Black History Month set aside because we need to acknowledge that we can’t talk about America’s history without including Black history. Honestly, I have mixed feelings about Black History Month. For me, it is a tool that we can use to dive further into America’s History, but it should also be celebrated past just the 28 days of February. We have seen the celebration of Black History Month extend from just a single day, to a week, to now a month. This is so positive, but I would like to see Black history taught in the schools year-round.

In retrospect, the Black history I was taught in school felt narrow in scope; Rosa Parks, Frederick Douglas, and Martin Luther King Jr. come to mind. Those people are so important, but in reality, there is so much more to discuss. People like Angela Davis and Fred Hampton need to be highlighted more often. We need to also acknowledge the difficult truths, like the fact that Martin Luther King jr. wasn’t well liked by the majority of the American people during the Civil Rights Movement, or that America would not be the powerhouse it is today without the exploitation of Black people through slavery. That is why it is important to keep educating ourselves on the past; there are so many more conversations to have.

Who is your role model? Who do you look up to?

My aunt. She was the oldest of 4 siblings and the only daughter. She was such a powerful woman, and carried herself in a way that commanded attention. But also, of course, Beyonce. It is awesome to see Black Women own who they are and exude confidence. She consistently provides a powerful message for all women, especially Black women, which is why I even got a tattoo of some of her song lyrics. I also love Flo Jo, still the fastest woman alive, rest in peace. As someone who is passionate about fitness, she is truly an inspiration to me. And last but not least, I can't forget Angela Davis, who is an American political activist and known for her association with the Black Panthers. I was actually lucky enough to meet her. She spoke at my school for Black History Month. Angela Davis told me “Keep the high ground. Keep fighting for your rights. And do it in the best way possible.”

What are you passionate about?

Being from Colorado, I really love hiking and exercising outdoors, but of course, with the cold I have been doing mostly home workouts. I love pilates, I love HIIT workouts — really, anything that gets my heart rate up and gets those endorphins flowing is awesome. I love listening to music; I especially miss concerts right now. Music makes me feel. When I am sad, music allows me to express my feelings and turn them into something constructive. And no matter my mood, I can always blast Beyonce.

What is something that you would want our customers to know about you? 

I feel like I already share a lot with my customers. But I want my customers to know that I have a great listening ear if there are questions that they have about something. We live in an area where people talk about politics all of the time, and it's normal to have questions. I don’t want them to feel like they can’t share anything with me, and vice versa. I would love to have those conversations candidly and respectively.


Diamond Holliday

Supervisor

"I can only hope that one day we will see Black History Month be longer than just a month—I hope that one day it is part of our every day education."

Tell us a bit about yourself, your role, and your experience at Compass Coffee.

My name is Diamond Holliday, I am a Supervisor at Compass Coffee and have been with Compass for over a year. I work at several of the cafés depending on the week, but I also really enjoy working out in Ivy City at our new roasting facility. While I was out there, I learned how to make our syrups and k-cups. Working in Ivy City made me appreciate the company in a different way, and allowed me to see behind-the-scenes, which really helped put things in perspective. I’m excited about our future!

What is your go-to coffee drink in the morning?

Caramel, vanilla latte with oat milk. I like to add a little vanilla for most drinks I make. We have the best vanilla syrup in DC! At home, I tend to just stick to drip coffee, something simple that keeps me warm during the winter.

What does Black History Month mean to you and why is it important to celebrate this month?

To me, Black History Month means that we get to celebrate Black people in our country and I get to see people everywhere show an appreciation for my history. I can only hope that one day we will see Black History Month be longer than just a month; I hope that one day it is part of our every day education. But for now, we will keep learning and keep having conversations with our friends, family, and everyone else.

Who is your role model? Who do you look up to?

My Step-Mom! I have known her since I was young; she has been around my whole life, even though my dad and her are no longer together. She inspires me to be a strong and caring woman. She currently teaches little kids, and watching her teach makes me want to help educate and inspire others too. She actually just moved to West Africa with my little brother to teach. I hope I can visit one day, I am going to miss them a lot while they are gone.

What are you passionate about?

I am about to graduate from school as an esthetician, which is crazy because I feel like I just started. I specifically want to focus on skin care and waxing. I actually just received my first waxing kit, and plan on eventually doing facials also. I chose to go into this field because I wanted to show an appreciation for the skin. I want to help women feel more secure in their skin and let them know that you don’t need make-up to show that you are beautiful; that is why I am pursuing a degree in esthetics. Eventually, I’d like to open up my own salon. But I think I would want to be a receptionist of a salon first to learn more about the business and get more experience.

Besides skin care, I am also passionate about Interior Design. I love to decorate; I am actually redoing my house right now section by section. I just finished my bedroom, and then I will move onto the living room and the kitchen. I normally don’t use any website for inspiration, just what is in my head. Sometimes I look through google but I always add my own flare to the designs.

What is something our customers should know about you?

It is important for me to treat everyone with respect. Even if I am having a bad day, my customers would never know. I really appreciate all of my customers for coming in every day, especially those that are waiting for us to open the doors!


Jordan Hawkins

Supervisor

"I am Black every month, not just February. It can be uncomfortable, Black History is uncomfortable, but that is okay. It’s also beautiful and expansive."

Tell us a bit about yourself, your role, and your experience at Compass Coffee.

My name is Jordan Hawkins, I am a Supervisor at Compass and I have been with Compass for about two years. I began at our 1401 I st. location and now I work at most of our cafés around DC, sometimes even out in Ivy City helping with our production processes. I was born in DC, grew up in Maryland, and just moved back to DC in September. It was definitely bad planning that the pandemic began just a few months after I moved here. I am most excited for all of the restaurants to reopen; I’m definitely a foodie, and have done my best to continue supporting food establishments during the pandemic. That being said, I am ready for more options!

What is your go-to coffee drink in the morning?

Iced turmeric honey latte with oat milk. It is a good balance of honey and oat milk. If I am ever looking for a quick boost of caffeine, there is always espresso and drip coffee! At home I don’t want too much caffeine, since I’m usually headed to a café. But for my shifts, I need to be energized; I drink it for caffeine and for the taste, of course!

What does Black History Month mean to you, and why is it important that we celebrate this month?

Growing up, it felt like something we did as a status quo and less so in order to educate. At times, it felt more like an obligation than a celebration. I found out more about Black history on my own, as opposed to in school. Now that I am no longer in school and not bound to a specific curriculum, it is so important to learn more about the involvement Black people had in many things that are important to us today. It is important to highlight that. Honestly, I learn more things about history on twitter than I ever did in school; at least it is convenient! It can be sad at times, to uncover fuller stories of Black history, and to learn truths that weren’t taught. A lot of history has been lost over time. That is why it is important to tell these stories, and learn the full context of our history. When I’m gone, my hope is that the story of my life is being told truthfully.

I am Black every month, not just February. It can be uncomfortable, Black History is uncomfortable, but that is okay. It’s also beautiful and expansive. There’s still so much to share, so much to learn.

Who is your role model? Who do you look up to?

My parents first and foremost. We don’t always see eye to eye, but I wouldn’t trade them for anything. I still hold the values that they raised me with, and have built upon them over time, as I’ve had my own experiences. I didn’t grow up having everything, I had to work hard for the things I wanted in life. But I know that they did their best and tried their hardest. I honestly can't say anyone else is my role model. I try not to have too many role models; I don’t want to model my life after anyone that I don’t know their whole story. But my parents, I know their story.

What are you passionate about?

I've honestly been struggling with this. I have been a creative person my entire life, and I am just learning how to channel it now with photography. I am still trying to figure out if this is what I even want to do. In 2018, I spent the year learning all types of photography: concerts, weddings, it was my exposure year. I settled on portrait photography. I like that photography can capture the moments of life; that's what drives me, important moments. I've tried a lot of different creative outlets, like podcasts. I even made clothes for a while. It is important to explore different passions and find what is meaningful to you.

What is something that you would want our customers to know about you?

Respect and compassion for one another. This pandemic has been challenging for everyone. It’s important to remember that there’s so much more to each of us as people, outside of the brief interactions we have with each other. This is too often forgotten in this fast-paced world, but it is a huge part in how we live our every day. I am a very respectful person, and really value people who are considerate to others — even in a two second interaction. Mutual respect is essential in my world.


Tawana Green

Barista Trainer

"A lot of times, people look at me and think I am a strong, tough person, which I am. But I also want people to know that I am caring, I am genuine, and I am looking to build relationships that I can maintain over a lifetime."

Tell us a bit about yourself, your role, and your experience at Compass Coffee.

My name is Tawana Green, and I work primarily at our Spring Valley café. I am currently training for a Barista Trainer position and should be finished with that within the next week. I’m excited to keep training with my manager, Nate; next up, Supervisor training! I have lived in DC all my life, born and raised, and have been in the coffee industry for most of my professional career.

What is your go-to coffee drink in the morning?

Any drip coffee. I make about two cups of coffee before I even come into my shift. When I come to work, I drink a dirty vanilla chai with oat milk. In the summer, I will still drink hot coffee first thing in the morning, but definitely gravitate more towards iced teas and refreshing drinks in the afternoon.

What does Black History Month mean to you and why is it important to celebrate this month?

Black History Month means everything to me. I am a firm believer that it isn't just during the month of February, it is every month of the year. We have so many things to celebrate, especially with the younger generation. It is important that we get influential names out there, especially in the surrounding neighborhoods. It can uplift the kids and let them think “I have a chance to become someone like Michelle Obama.”

The education on Black History Month isn’t taught the same way it was when I was a kid. We had the Black History Month book report that we had to turn in, of course — but that is really it. I mean, we touched on a few topics throughout the year, but the main focus was always in February. I read a quote once that always stuck with me: “You can't move forward if you don't know where you came from.” That is why learning about Black History Month is so important.

Who is your role model? Who do you look up to?

My mom; she is no longer with me anymore, unfortunately. As long as I am here, my ultimate goal is to make her happy. Michelle Obama is another role model; she is the epitome of class. Anyone who can just walk into a room and shut the room down, should be someone you look up to. In my previous job, we catered healthy organic lunches for school. Michelle Obama actually created that program. We had the chance to visit the White House and hear her talk about obesity and taking care of yourself. Anyone like Michelle Obama, who takes the time out of their busy schedule to talk to the people, is someone who I look up to. One day, I would like to be recognized as someone who commands respect based on their actions, just like Michelle.

What are you passionate about?

Photography. I love looking at pictures and I love taking pictures even more. I have been studying photography seriously for about a year. I enrolled with a studio where we are learning advanced photography, and then we will learn film and video photography. I didn’t realize it was so complicated. I have always taken photos with my phone, and not to brag, but they are the bomb. What really motivated me was this pandemic. Before I found Compass Coffee, I was just sitting at home, with extra time on my hands. I wanted to be driven and continue to be a part of the community. Even with everything becoming a standstill, memories don't stop. Photos are how we are going to remember these times in 20 years. I want the world to see my view of the world. Right now, I am just freelancing and taking photos of my friends and family, I love sunrises and sunsets, but I do want to eventually get into pet photography. Everyone wants to do weddings, bridal showers, or baby showers, but who is taking the pet’s photos?

At the end of the day, my dream is to be a DC photographer, with Compass Coffee always in hand.

What is something that you would want our customers to know about you?

A lot of times, people look at me and think I am a strong, tough person, which I am. But I also want people to know that I am caring, I am genuine, and I am looking to build relationships that I can maintain over a lifetime. I don’t want people to feel uncomfortable around me; you can come and talk to me about anything.


Tell us a bit about yourself, your role, and your experience at Compass Coffee.

My name is Diamond Holliday, I am a Supervisor at Compass Coffee and have been with Compass for over a year. I work at several of the cafés depending on the week, but I also really enjoy working out in Ivy City at our new roasting facility. While I was out there, I learned how to make our syrups and k-cups. Working in Ivy City made me appreciate the company in a different way, and allowed me to see behind-the-scenes, which really helped put things in perspective. I’m excited about our future!

What is your go-to coffee drink in the morning?

Caramel, vanilla latte with oat milk. I like to add a little vanilla for most drinks I make. We have the best vanilla syrup in DC! At home, I tend to just stick to drip coffee, something simple that keeps me warm during the winter.

What does Black History Month mean to you and why is it important to celebrate this month?

To me, Black History Month means that we get to celebrate Black people in our country and I get to see people everywhere show an appreciation for my history. I can only hope that one day we will see Black History Month be longer than just a month; I hope that one day it is part of our every day education. But for now, we will keep learning and keep having conversations with our friends, family, and everyone else.

Who is your role model? Who do you look up to?

My Step-Mom! I have known her since I was young; she has been around my whole life, even though my dad and her are no longer together. She inspires me to be a strong and caring woman. She currently teaches little kids, and watching her teach makes me want to help educate and inspire others too. She actually just moved to West Africa with my little brother to teach. I hope I can visit one day, I am going to miss them a lot while they are gone.

What are you passionate about?

I am about to graduate from school as an esthetician, which is crazy because I feel like I just started. I specifically want to focus on skin care and waxing. I actually just received my first waxing kit, and plan on eventually doing facials also. I chose to go into this field because I wanted to show an appreciation for the skin. I want to help women feel more secure in their skin and let them know that you don’t need make-up to show that you are beautiful; that is why I am pursuing a degree in esthetics. Eventually, I’d like to open up my own salon. But I think I would want to be a receptionist of a salon first to learn more about the business and get more experience.

Besides skin care, I am also passionate about Interior Design. I love to decorate; I am actually redoing my house right now section by section. I just finished my bedroom, and then I will move onto the living room and the kitchen. I normally don’t use any website for inspiration, just what is in my head. Sometimes I look through google but I always add my own flare to the designs.

What is something our customers should know about you?

It is important for me to treat everyone with respect. Even if I am having a bad day, my customers would never know. I really appreciate all of my customers for coming in every day, especially those that are waiting for us to open the doors!

Diamond Holliday

Supervisor

"I can only hope that one day we will see Black History Month be longer than just a month—I hope that one day it is part of our every day education."


Jordan Hawkins

Supervisor

"I am Black every month, not just February. It can be uncomfortable, Black History is uncomfortable, but that is okay. It’s also beautiful and expansive."

Tell us a bit about yourself, your role, and your experience at Compass Coffee.

My name is Jordan Hawkins, I am a Supervisor at Compass and I have been with Compass for about two years. I began at our 1401 I st. location and now I work at most of our cafés around DC, sometimes even out in Ivy City helping with our production processes. I was born in DC, grew up in Maryland, and just moved back to DC in September. It was definitely bad planning that the pandemic began just a few months after I moved here. I am most excited for all of the restaurants to reopen; I’m definitely a foodie, and have done my best to continue supporting food establishments during the pandemic. That being said, I am ready for more options!

What is your go-to coffee drink in the morning?

Iced turmeric honey latte with oat milk. It is a good balance of honey and oat milk. If I am ever looking for a quick boost of caffeine, there is always espresso and drip coffee! At home I don’t want too much caffeine, since I’m usually headed to a café. But for my shifts, I need to be energized; I drink it for caffeine and for the taste, of course!

What does Black History Month mean to you, and why is it important that we celebrate this month?

Growing up, it felt like something we did as a status quo and less so in order to educate. At times, it felt more like an obligation than a celebration. I found out more about Black history on my own, as opposed to in school. Now that I am no longer in school and not bound to a specific curriculum, it is so important to learn more about the involvement Black people had in many things that are important to us today. It is important to highlight that. Honestly, I learn more things about history on twitter than I ever did in school; at least it is convenient! It can be sad at times, to uncover fuller stories of Black history, and to learn truths that weren’t taught. A lot of history has been lost over time. That is why it is important to tell these stories, and learn the full context of our history. When I’m gone, my hope is that the story of my life is being told truthfully.

I am Black every month, not just February. It can be uncomfortable, Black History is uncomfortable, but that is okay. It’s also beautiful and expansive. There’s still so much to share, so much to learn.

Who is your role model? Who do you look up to?

My parents first and foremost. We don’t always see eye to eye, but I wouldn’t trade them for anything. I still hold the values that they raised me with, and have built upon them over time, as I’ve had my own experiences. I didn’t grow up having everything, I had to work hard for the things I wanted in life. But I know that they did their best and tried their hardest. I honestly can't say anyone else is my role model. I try not to have too many role models; I don’t want to model my life after anyone that I don’t know their whole story. But my parents, I know their story.

What are you passionate about?

I've honestly been struggling with this. I have been a creative person my entire life, and I am just learning how to channel it now with photography. I am still trying to figure out if this is what I even want to do. In 2018, I spent the year learning all types of photography: concerts, weddings, it was my exposure year. I settled on portrait photography. I like that photography can capture the moments of life; that's what drives me, important moments. I've tried a lot of different creative outlets, like podcasts. I even made clothes for a while. It is important to explore different passions and find what is meaningful to you.

What is something that you would want our customers to know about you? 

Respect and compassion for one another. This pandemic has been challenging for everyone. It’s important to remember that there’s so much more to each of us as people, outside of the brief interactions we have with each other. This is too often forgotten in this fast-paced world, but it is a huge part in how we live our every day. I am a very respectful person, and really value people who are considerate to others — even in a two second interaction. Mutual respect is essential in my world.


Tell us a bit about yourself, your role, and your experience at Compass Coffee.

My name is Tawana Green, and I work primarily at our Spring Valley café. I am currently training for a Barista Trainer position and should be finished with that within the next week. I’m excited to keep training with my manager, Nate; next up, Supervisor training! I have lived in DC all my life, born and raised, and have been in the coffee industry for most of my professional career.

What is your go-to coffee drink in the morning?

Any drip coffee. I make about two cups of coffee before I even come into my shift. When I come to work, I drink a dirty vanilla chai with oat milk. In the summer, I will still drink hot coffee first thing in the morning, but definitely gravitate more towards iced teas and refreshing drinks in the afternoon.

What does Black History Month mean to you and why is it important to celebrate this month?

Black History Month means everything to me. I am a firm believer that it isn't just during the month of February, it is every month of the year. We have so many things to celebrate, especially with the younger generation. It is important that we get influential names out there, especially in the surrounding neighborhoods. It can uplift the kids and let them think “I have a chance to become someone like Michelle Obama.”

The education on Black History Month isn’t taught the same way it was when I was a kid. We had the Black History Month book report that we had to turn in, of course — but that is really it. I mean, we touched on a few topics throughout the year, but the main focus was always in February. I read a quote once that always stuck with me: “You can't move forward if you don't know where you came from.” That is why learning about Black History Month is so important.

Who is your role model? Who do you look up to?

My mom; she is no longer with me anymore, unfortunately. As long as I am here, my ultimate goal is to make her happy. Michelle Obama is another role model; she is the epitome of class. Anyone who can just walk into a room and shut the room down, should be someone you look up to. In my previous job, we catered healthy organic lunches for school. Michelle Obama actually created that program. We had the chance to visit the White House and hear her talk about obesity and taking care of yourself. Anyone like Michelle Obama, who takes the time out of their busy schedule to talk to the people, is someone who I look up to. One day, I would like to be recognized as someone who commands respect based on their actions, just like Michelle.

What are you passionate about?

Photography. I love looking at pictures and I love taking pictures even more. I have been studying photography seriously for about a year. I enrolled with a studio where we are learning advanced photography, and then we will learn film and video photography. I didn’t realize it was so complicated. I have always taken photos with my phone, and not to brag, but they are the bomb. What really motivated me was this pandemic. Before I found Compass Coffee, I was just sitting at home, with extra time on my hands. I wanted to be driven and continue to be a part of the community. Even with everything becoming a standstill, memories don't stop. Photos are how we are going to remember these times in 20 years. I want the world to see my view of the world. Right now, I am just freelancing and taking photos of my friends and family, I love sunrises and sunsets, but I do want to eventually get into pet photography. Everyone wants to do weddings, bridal showers, or baby showers, but who is taking the pet’s photos?

At the end of the day, my dream is to be a DC photographer, with Compass Coffee always in hand.

What is something that you would want our customers to know about you?

A lot of times, people look at me and think I am a strong, tough person, which I am. But I also want people to know that I am caring, I am genuine, and I am looking to build relationships that I can maintain over a lifetime. I don’t want people to feel uncomfortable around me; you can come and talk to me about anything.

Tawana Green

Barista Trainer

"A lot of times, people look at me and think I am a strong, tough person, which I am. But I also want people to know that I am caring, I am genuine, and I am looking to build relationships that I can maintain over a lifetime."